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OhioJoePosted - 1 April 2009 22:4  Show Profile
Question 3 on the 4test practice GRE seems flawed. I hate to post this, because I might be missing something, thus implying I have weak critical analysis skills (which I don't).

Basically, the question does not provide enough information to pick any answer, but the test shows one anyway (by highlighting it in yellow when I click "show answer"), then doesn't explain why (which is important, because I can't figure out why that is supposedly the correct answer). Here is the question and the answer they give, then their supposed summary of why that answer is correct, then my complaint:


********************************
A, B, C, D, E, F, and G are the father, the mother, the aunt, the brother, the sister, the wife, and the daughter of Z, but she has been unable to determine which person has which status. She knows:

* C and D are of the same sex
* A and B are not of the same sex
* F was born before A
* D is not the mother of Z.

...answer the following question.

Which of the following must be true?
A is female.
B is female.
C is female. <-highlighted in yellow.
D is male.
F is male.

Explanation of Answer:
We know that for A and B, one is male and one is female, however we do not have enough information to justify which is female. Nor is there any information to support the conclusion that D or F is male.

*******************************
Basically, the summary states what I determined, that there is not enough information to determine the gender of any of the letters given. BUT... the summary doesn't explain why the test picked "C is female". C can be either male or female in the scenario given. There is not enough information to determine ANY of the letters' genders, including the letter C. Why then does the test show "C is female" as the correct answer, meanwhile, not explaining why it is?

Any thoughts on this anyone?

OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:15  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:16  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:16  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:16  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:16  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
OhioJoe Posted - 1 April 2009 22:16  Show Profile
Nevermind. Figured it out about 2 minutes after posting this. but the second half of my complaint is still valid.. the summary didn't explain WHY C is correct. C is correct because C and D cannot be males, since there ar eonly 2 males in the mix (father and brother). So, since A and B are opposite sex (therefore, one *must* be male), we know C and D *must* be female, otherwise if they were male, it would make 3 male figures, when the description only describes TWO males possible (again, the brother and the father).</P><P>So, glad I figured it out, but the answer summary should still explain it.<BR>
evans529 Posted - 23 April 2009 12:45  Show Profile
I am not sure about the problems you posted, but I know the answer to the question below is wrong- They marked my answer incorrect and calculated for 100 math problems...when the question actually shows 50math problems. My answer was really correct. See the question:</P><P>Section: Quantitative <BR> <BR>19) There are 200 questions on a 3-hour exam. Among these questions are 50 mathematics problems. It is suggested that twice as much time be allowed for each mathematics problem as for each of the other questions. How many minutes should be spent on the mathematics problems? <BR> <BR> 36 minutes <BR> 60 minutes <BR> 72 minutes <BR> 100 minutes <BR> 120 minutes <BR> <BR> <BR>Explanation of Answer:<BR>Let x equal the number of minutes allowed for each of the questions other than the math problems. Then </P><P>2x equals the number of minutes allowed for each math problem,<BR>100x equals the number of minutes allowed for all the math problems, <BR>150x equals the number of minutes for all other questions.<BR>100x + 150x = 180 minutes<BR>250x = 180 minutes<BR>x = 180/250<BR>x = .72 minutes<BR>.72 minutes * 100 math questions = 72 minutes<BR> <BR> <BR>
prakash141986 Posted - 15 June 2009 10:46  Show Profile
yes,</P><P>72 minutes is correct answer

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